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Why I am hating Tutorials


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#1 Flying Geese

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Posted 29 April 2014 - 09:42 AM

So far in every tutorial I have done so far, both paid and unpaid, they have been quite unhelpful in helping me learn Rails. Setting up the IDE was 3 days of mental anguish. Then after thinking that the tutorial was infallible, I wasted another 2 days. I then went to another tutorial. And that's when I learned that your application always starts out functional in the beginning. Not very long into the tutorials, your app should break if you follow along with the teacher. You job, then, is to find out what steps are the ones you actually need to do, and what steps are the ones that break your app (and also find out why, if possible).

 

In this way, you really learn a new style of learning. I am not sure what to call this. I am learning to rely more on myself though. Even though I still can't build anything yet.



#2 Jamie

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Posted 08 May 2014 - 08:11 AM

Hey

 

The issue with Rails is that it is a active fast growing framework which changes everyday and a new stable release comes around the corner very quickly all of the time.

 

I'd try keeping up to date as much as you can but reading tutorials which are 3+ months old may have parts to it which are irrelevant.

 

Hope you find the answer you're looking for :)

 

 

JB


Rails developer based in Newcastle, UK.


#3 dahuk

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Posted 18 May 2014 - 10:33 PM

Wait until you start trying to deploy your first app :-)



#4 Bjornst

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Posted 20 May 2014 - 12:03 PM

Find a ruby on rails meetup group in your area. Some of these groups has a recurring Rails installfest where you can get help in setting up your own development environment and help with doing your very first webapp. Thats what i did and it helped me a lot. Then i also used https://www.codeschool.com/ and http://teamtreehouse.com/ to get me starting on how to learn coding more advanced rails apps. Codeschool's Rails for Zombies are a classic in learning the basics of Ruby on Rails. 

 

http://meetup.com has lots of Ruby on Rails meetup groups. 



#5 ahnbizcad

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Posted 06 July 2014 - 10:03 PM

Dude I feel your pain man. I tried some of the tutorials, and as they are, most tutorials really lack a certain smething. I've wondered about what that something was. I found it to be LIVE HELP. Tutorials are simply bound to have missing points, or slight changes that just don't work, and you're at a loss. Often times, examples are too simple for your needs. And they give you pieces of info, but don't give you all the info in that set (like a method, but not all other methods you can call on)

Other tutorials were great, and honestly, I found the best tutorials to be the ones that essentially give you the code. I know a lot of programmers will poop on me for saying this, but in the beginning, it really is about familiarization. You can always go back, figure out, ask questions, and understand the detailed workings behind the code. For beginners, we don't even know what we don't know. Helpers? how many configuration files do I need to do? So a controller goes to routes, and there is this thing called CRUD?

feel like beginners need a quick crash course and go through multiple cycles of learning how to make an app. Getting bogged down by the details, especially if you're trying to figure out what you're evne missing only serves to slow you down with not much to gain. You will have plenty of time to struggle with problems. Let's struggle with more interesting problems, not the basics, and maybe even create soemthing useful while learning.

After going through multiple tutorials, I'm convinced the best way to learn for many people is through live help, as well as a good tutorial. Check out https://www.hackerupt.com/ They have a lead expert who can help you work out any issues you have .You also get a team, so you can help and ask each other, making learning way less stressful, and FASTER, since teammates may have figured out a bug that you haven't. The course itself is very practical, and the most up-to-date as of this writing.

Whatever you do, FIND people to learn with, and get help from. Don't be shy about asking! I've found there are many really really generous, helpful, and friendly people who have helped me SO much, I feel like I want to give back too. It's a cycle of charity, and love of code! =]



#6 nailbrain

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Posted 08 August 2014 - 11:42 PM

Good post. I am having the same problem. My brain is socked through with theory but how do I piece it all together. I was going to come up with a concept and work backwards from there but even still there is so much to rails you can't think of a single thing let alone the whole framework and all it has to offer. 



#7 kd2tv

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Posted 08 August 2014 - 11:49 PM

I am on this same boat as you. I am following a tutorial on lynda.com for ruby on rails 4. Everything has gone fine until I get a "NameError", I do not know why I am getting this error as I have been following the instruction and have the same code as the instructor in the videos. It is frustrating, but I guess you can not learn anything if everything went right all the time; we would just be following steps and not really understanding how rails actually works. 



#8 ahnbizcad

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Posted 09 August 2014 - 01:52 AM

The Antipatterns book is actually good for teaching you how to use rails, not just refactoring. It's a great intermediate book.

Reading this book is like what someone reading a book might expect: you expect to read it, and then be able to apply those concepts. This approach just doesn't really work for beginners, and with most other books. But with this book, after you understand the basics, you will ACTUALLY be able to read it, and then apply the lessons to real apps.






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